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cuomo from erik. james says in connecticut there are two major problems, the deficit and more taxes. both problems are created by one party rule. what are the big issues in your state? join that conversation on facebook by looking for c-span. let us take a look at the balance of power in state. we can see here who controls the governors' seats. 30 republicans states in red, 19 democratic, and one independent in rhode island. but as your what ray has to say on our democrats line. caller: good morning. i wanted to say that i believe here in the state of texas -- our standard of living is what keeps is going. nobody can live on $7.25 hour. our standard of living is so below the economy it should be at $12 per hour. everything is so expensive right now. it should be, at the very least, $12 per hour. host: you are calling to raise the minimum wage? caller: yes, ma'am. if everybody makes at least $12 an hour, this country would boom so fast. here in the state of texas -- i think it is everywhere. the corruption of the governor and the mayor. big corporate donors, big business owners. they
to pass a budget, but the senate cease going to pass a democratic budget, one that raises taxes and probably increased spending, too, and what good is that? we're not requiring the senate to balance the budget in ten years, 25 years, or ever. i don't know what good is coming from the deal. you're right. it's unfortunate, and it's a retreat. remember this, he may not have the votes to pass it tomorrow. conservatives in the house can still step up and say, no, listen, we're doing something today. today is the day to save the nation and children. neil: could be the argument that, you know, cooler heads prevail, get the ducks in order doing this in may versus now. i think on both party's houses for just delaying making such decisions, period. >> we've been kicking the can for a couple of years, if not longer, others argue that, but i think having this conversation four times a year for the next couple years or however long it takes is a really, really bad idea because the margs needs stability. businesses need stability. >> maybe not. the markets are fine with it. >> creditors need
to hire the energy commission. california became the leader in energy efficiency. we put in tax credits and policies of the public utilities commission to favor alternative energy, independent power production. which is obvious today. when they promoted code- generation it was something very novel. 30 years ago. now you have a different name for a period in his third party power production using power in a driving way to recapture the most efficient way. innovation is important. i have to also, every time we heard the word innovation, i have to put a plug in for tradition. i have a very traditional education. i spent a lot of years in silence speaking latin up in the hills, living within the medieval framework. i do respect the past. we study it. if you are grounded in tradition, you feel quite confident in change and innovation. if you are insecure, you are very reluctant to embrace the unknown. i do think we need to in our education and politics, we have to have a new appreciation for our traditions and the patterns that describe our culture and our being as americans. having said all
-- >> maximum? >> they should pay their fair share. >> sean: give me a fair share number. >> i like a flat tax. >> sean: between state, local, federal and isn't it sad people are thinking of moving states? and some people might leave the country, that's sad. >> only people with options can do that and we're losing track of that. >> sean: when those people leave, guess who is going to pay? the people who are left. >> yeah, and the states are being dug into the ground with all of these. >> sean: and we've got to run, but we expect momentarily that vice-president biden will be addressing the troops on this inauguration night. congratulations to the president, first lady for ing, that's all the time at we have left. greta is next to go "on the record" and we'll see you tomorrow night. >> greta: tonight, it's blistering, it isn't so much what was said, but who said it. is the cbs news political director and telling president obama to pulverize and destroy republicans. but tonight, scott walker is here and how are he and other governors planning for president obama's second term. governor walker in
solutions. arrive from texas, no more reform, no more income tax, flat, or otherwise. passed a fair tax, tax consumption, not income, taxing income is counterproductive. and it does thank you for your optimistic outlook for america. needed a lift. glass half full, my friend. finally, another example of waste, fraud, and abuse. this time from louisiana. a local newspaper in danvers talking about a little-known state law that will make residents pay more at the grocery store. alysian requires that grocers markup milk prices 6% above the invoice and shipping costs, 6%. a local store called fresh market has a weekly special, gallons of milk for $2.99 each and every tuesday. not anymore. the state is worried such deals to drive competitors out of business. isn't that what free-market are about? if they want to compete, lower prices. if not, what consumers walk up the door. that's my "2 cents more." it's obvious. coming in tomorrow, president obama's says deficit reduction is not a goal unto itself. shouldn't it be? of every action. that's it for tonight on "the willis report." thank you for joini
of people paying slightly higher taxes. one of the things going on with uncertainty coming up on may 18th and how we deal with the debt ceiling. the potential for the federal government to shut down. i think many people underestimate the significance of the federal government as a part of, you know, what drives the u.s. economy. melissa: so what could they be doing you think to make things better? what could turn things around from a trucking perspective? >> i think in recent history, anytime our leaders here in washington make, you know, get a decision made, even if it is not what everybody likes or agrees with, the more certainty there is in the business community, the more likely we are to see investment and people making plans about moving forward. i mean i think it is too early to tell how consumer sentiment and consumer behavior is going to be impacted by the, by the tax increases. i mean everybody saw the 2% hit on the payroll tax expiration, what, a little less than 1% on the health care costs. so, we just don't know yet. that impacts us directly because we move a the of retail go
-insured reverse mortgage. it will eliminate your monthly mortgage payments and give you tax-free cash from the equity in your home. and here's the best part -- you still own your home. take control of your retirement today. ♪ ♪ >> if you've ever stepped in poop you know how gross it is when people don't clean up after their dogs. well, one apartment complex in plano, texas, requiring dog owners to submit a dna sample. if there's poop around the complex, they do dna tests and the culprit has to pay a $250 fine. >> that's technology working to better mankind. >> i thought it was over the top, but they took it to a new level. >> good to have you. >> "america live" is now. >> a fox news alert on the showdown over the debt ceiling. house republicans shifting gears allowing new plans to allow the government to keep borrowing money for several more months preventing a first default on u.s. obligations that could come a week from today. there's a catch. welcome to "america live," i'm in for megyn kelly today. the legislation would require lawmakers to pass a budget and if they don't, they don
austerity or the taxes are used to bail out governments on the other side of the continent. we are starting to see this in the demonstrations on the streets of athens, magid and world. we're starting to see it in the parliaments of berlin, helsinki and the hague. and yes, of course, we are seeing this frustration with the eu very dramatically here in the united kingdom. europe's leaders have a duty to hear these concerns. indeed, we have a duty to act on them. and not just to fix the problems in the eurozone. for just as in any emergency you should plan for the aftermath as well as dealing with the present crisis, so, too, in the midst of the present challenges we should plan for the future, and what the world will look like when the difficulties and the eurozone have been overcome. now, the biggest danger to the european union comes not from those who advocate change, but from those who denounce new thinking as heresy. in its long history europe has experience of heretics who turned out to have a point. and my point is this. more the same on the secure a long-term future for the eurozone.
and taxes even more, whether it is cap and trade, regulating our economy and raising the costs for every american, they are feeling emboldened right now. and if conservatives stand together, we can stop that, and stopping bad things that would harm this country, that would harm americans, is a major victory for the next two years. [applause] but the third thing we can do in the short term is we can use leverage points to plaque real progress on the fiscal and economic crisis threatening this country. the fundamental dynamic when you have divided government is that whichever side owns the default is in the stronger position. either party can stop anything. so whoever wins if nothing gets done, wins the negotiation, wins the battle. it's why on fiscal cliff we got such a lousy deal. because if nothing happened, the result was a massive tax increase on er american who pays taxes, and i think president obama was perfectly fine, he was serene to go off that cliff. why? because his substantive agenda, which he doesn't hide from, is to dramatically expand the size and power of government, and t
see anything different. a lot of revenue and cash was earned due to taxes coming up. so people front loaded earnings, cash money, liquidity that were currently enjoying. but i'm not quite sure we didn't steal from this year and as the year wears on whether that's going to be an issue not going forward. >> you're saying there were so many expectations that we took them from the future and perhaps things slow down later on in 2013? >> i do believe that's a risk factor. and i think also it will depend on what comes out of washington with respect to structure reform in a number of areas too. you know, at the end of the day, we just don't see the base revenue growth on a really exciting basis going forward. we have hints of it, but we're not there yet. companies aren't truly spending. they're still sitting on cash. they paid a lot of dividends last year. they're not hiring people right now. and there's a lot of wait and see. what's the environment going to look like before businesses really get aggressive in business development. i think that could weigh in going forward. the other would
words. a decision by government to limit green house gas emissions by heavily taxing or tapping the use of carbon based fuels. is that a fair estimation? that issue, because of what it could do to oil -- is what really kind of had them shaking in their boots. >> guest: it was a combination how a rare -- they had overcome the previous systemic threats to oil production in the world, which were spills and environmental damage and the seepage of oil into water and drinking supplies and air pollution, all of that had been more or less brought into a sustainable compact of regulator and regulated, and they had been themselves adopted -- they accepted the validity of these environmental goals when it comes to spills and air pollution and so target. that they had imposed costs on. thes in order to build the sustainable compacts so just at the moment when they have cruising speed on the other environmental issues that arose in the first three or four decades of the order world, now comes this an distract globalham challenge to the prime si of fossil fuels in our system. i think that was one fac
at 19 for senator hatfield, i had the very good fortune to be assigned to the tax reform act of 1976. and then i had the even better fortune that it came up on the floor of the senate. so during the many days it was before this body i sat up in the staff gallery and watched as amendment after amendment was raised and debated on and voted on. there was no camera, no email, the member of the senate team that was responsible for it would run down from the staff gallery, intercept your senator, explain what the issue was, what had been said about it, what folks back home thought about it, what the set of motions had been done on it, and it was a legislature at work. and rarely, rarely did the thought that anything would not be decided by 51 pass the minds of the senators. that was something observed, that objection to 51 was reserved for very special occasions, very rare occasions you might do once or twice in your career. i do -- i do feel like the conversation we have before us is so important, and i thought i'd put up this chart. this just dramatizes -- and my colleague can see it --
the money that you need toward all of this. and i'd like to get your take on the tax structure that is most favorable to getting people to be as generous as they can. what could you tell our viewers in terms of what government policy may be able to do to actually encourage more giving and how it can hurt? >> well, the tax deductibility of charitable giving certainly has been a positive factor in why the u.s. is the most generous. people give about 2% of their incomes and that's true it's not disproportionately the richest. across the board americans are quite generous. the estate tax which lets your charitable giving not be taxed is clearly a very positive encouragement to look at giving. i'd say that even more than the taxes, though, the fact that there's more examples of people where -- so everyone is asking themselves, you know, could i be giving you something, the fact that they hear the impact is very strong, i think the kind of social movement is even more, but the tax structure helps. >> what continuing investment is needed at this point? in other words who are the biggest stakeholde
and wondered whether there was selling for tax reasons and things of that nature and the people i have spoken to this morning, who do manage money, say the same. all right. let's watch it today. let it weed out and then perhaps revisit it in a few days. >> a couple of dividend. you talked about how that could help, maybe they actually go in and do a buy back of monstrous proportions. >> that could be around the corner. their next meeting, board meeting, is february, when they initiated the dividend f that's catalyst that's a catalyst. isn't it sad to think this was once the go go growth company and now looking the a possible dividend or buy back as the next catalyst for the shares? my how things have changed. >> that requires a management that thinks there's something wrong with the stock. requires a management to hit the stock, maybe they are, maybe they are not. >> buy back or a dividend, acknowledgments? >> so clear the stock was blowing up during the conference call. very clear, but the company was talking about good product, good product. >> companies don't want to acknowledge they are n
seems to want to continue to plow higher. >> absolutely. we have some tax clarity. we have some debt ceiling clarity. you give the market clarity, and improving economic numbers and decent earnings season hard for us not to rally higher. you know, we're closing over 1500. we closed over 1500 under monday. i think that is really bullish for the next couple of weeks at least through friday's employment numbers. i want to point out something really interesting that is happening. the jcj the correlation index. little in the weeds here. but what it really measures how stocks are correlating to the s&p 500. when stocks are correlating a lot, that's bearish stocks and it makes stock picking very, very difficult because really you're picking stocks, a slave to the overall market. that index is now at precrisis lows. so stock pick something now something we can do. something we haven't been able to do for a long period of time. so what are we seeing this first quarter? stocks are moving but the indexes are not. so you're being rewarded for being a good stock-picker and being penalized, apple,
his speech as a kind of a call to action. from climate change to the tax code, he promised reforms. >> our interests compel us to act on those who long for freedom. >> every word was meant to reinforce a progressive agenda. >> our agenda is not clear unless everybody is treated equally under the law. >> the theme of racial and sexual equality was front and center, i think a lot of the second term will be devoted to a lot of other things. >> the president takes one last look noting he will not ever see this again. he will not be the focus of another 9000-person parade. he could barely stop himself from dancing until he got the chance to, for he begins what is expected to be a fierce fight with congress if he hopes to make any additions to his legacy. companybia's state oil is planning rebels for an explosion of a pipeline. it cost a small spill -- it caused a small sill. pill. a truce was declared. at least 60,000 people have been killed in the past six years. many police officers have also died in the line of duty. are leaving the force because they say it is no longer worth the ri
, $500,000 in legal fees for her defense attorney, jose baez, in addition to over $200,000 in back taxes, fees and penalties. according to the courts, the aim of seeking chapter 7 bankruptcy protection is to be discharged of existing debts essentially to get a fresh financial start, a fresh start, which is something casey anthony is certainly no stranger to. and cbs affiliate kpho reports that anthony spoke with one of their anchors and called the filing "the next step towards closure." >>> and popular snacks including devil dogs, ring-dings and yodels will soon or could soon be back on store shelves. the maker of little debbie snack cakes is reportedly the leading bidder to buy those brands from bankrupt hostess for up to $30 million. hostess still hasn't announced a lead bid for its most iconic treat, the twinkie, so the twinkie's fate is still up in the air. i'm sure that will be settled. >>> and, finally, an unexpected visitor greeted a delay or created a delay at a college basketball game on saturday. it was a bat, a bat flying around the bradley center, there you see it in milwauke
$2 a day. helping protect your business is our business. adt. always there. ...tax time can ofbe...well...taxing. so right now we'll give you... ...$10 off any turbo tax deluxe level software or higher! find thousands of big deals now... ...at officemax. >>> virginia's plan to rig the electoral system and award electoral votes by congressional district looks to be dead in the water. republican governor bob mcdonnell and ken cuccinelli, the commonwealth's attorney general, have both come out against the republican plan which would have made it easier for republicans to win that battleground state. that's good news for anyone who cares about fairness in elections and proves that not everyone is in the mickey mouse club in this issue. still, republicans in four other swing states, pennsylvania, ohio, wisconsin, and michigan, are considering similar measures to rig the vote. we'll be right back. [ male announcer ] you are a business pro. executor of efficiency. you can spot an amateur from a mile away... while going shoeless and metal-free in seconds. and you...rent from national. because only natio
. obama demands the wealthy pay their fair share of taxes, but it's just elitist hypocrite when this comes it a fair share of security. protection for their kids and gun-free zones for ours. >> sean: powerful ad, but yet, anything the n.r.a. points out seems to just come under attack. >> well, i mean, it's come to the point in this country at that hypocrisy is right out there in the open. i mean, the fact is, all of these are backing hee and political people when their kids go to school, by and large protected by police and armed security. i mean, what's unfair is there are moms and dads all over this country, getting up and sending their kids to school on monday and tuesday next week that are praying that their kids come whom safe. and we could immediately help protect those kids by putting armed security in schools, same armed security that the elite has. it's the same with self-defense. these celebrities in hollywood, the rich, the powerful, the politicians are all protected, body guards, security, all the magazines they want. i mean, since when does the idea of protection limited to a
demands the wealthy pay their fair share of taxes, but it's just elitist hypocrite when this comes it a fair share of security. protection for their kids and gun-free zones for ours. >> sean: powerful ad, but yet, anything the n.r.a. points out seems to just come under attack. >> well, i mean, it's come to the point in this country at that hypocrisy is right out there in the open. i mean, the fact is, all of these are backing hee and political people when their kids go to school, by and large protected by police and armed security. i mean, what's unfair is there are moms and dads all over this country, getting up and sending their kids to school on monday and tuesday next week that are praying that their kids come whom safe. and we could immediately help protect those kids by putting armed security in schools, same armed security that the elite has. it's the same with self-defense. these celebrities in hollywood, the rich, the powerful, the politicians are all protected, body guards, security, all the magazines they want. i mean, since when does the idea of protection limited to a
near fiscal consolidations in the united states. concerns about like the sequester, entitlement and tax reform. policy action must urgently address the risks in the u.s. the key imf forecast headline numbers, 2% growth for the u.s. in 2013, rising above trend in the second half of the year. the forecast for europe, that area revised downward. expected to contract by .2 of a percent in 2013, rather than expanding by a modest .1% back in the forecast in october. no downgrade of growth in japan, despite renewed recession there. forecasts still for 1.2% growth in 2013. and finally, the prescription for china, sustaining a rapid growth, progress on market oriented and structural forms there and more emphasis on private consumption inside china. back to you guys. >> hampton pearson, thank you. >>> google shares up sharply this morning after the company beat estimates in the earnings, setting a surge in ad sales profit. both gentlemen this morning have raised price targets on google. you raised your rating to $900 a share. the price target, that is. you've got a buy rating on the stock. in ter
illinois being in so much debt, they were talking about this 67% tax increase on the people who live in that state. what ramifications will this now have on that tax rate? >> that tax increase was supposed to be temporary, start to run out, put it down again in 2015. odds are it will not be temporary. odds are it will be made permanent. >>brian: i love your last point of view. you said look for the businesses and wealthy people to pull a mickelson? >> yeah, sure. >>brian: which means? >>gretchen: nothing to do with their golf swing. >> mickelson threatens to leave california because of high taxes and declining state finances. why shouldn't wealthy people do the same in illinois? taxes are way up there. the state's finances are a mess. they know they're going to call on the rich to pay your fair share. they know it's coming. >>gretchen: some businesses have gone to wisconsin and indiana. >>brian: what you're talking about is if they're going to increase the taxes in the state itself, that's one thing. but -- and this is something you've been hedging for over a year -- there's always a
: the president also did however discuss revamping the tax code, reducing healthcare spending, trying to reduce deficits, but acknowledging the realities of divided government, said, quote, today's victories will only be partial. cheryl? cheryl: peter barnes of course standing by at the white house, big day in d.c., cold day as well. peter thank you. well, while most of the markets are closed today, money is still moving. now is your chance to make money on currencies. joining me now for a fox business exclusive interview is forex.com senior currency strategist. welcome. currency markets are moving today. currency is a bit of great interest with regards to the european currencies and there's japan. big meeting today, bank of japan, more concern about deflation in that country, what is your reading right now on the country of japan and the yen in particular? >> they have been taking some pretty extraordinary measures over the past to months or so -- past two months or so. been very very aggressive in terms of easing the japanese yen. he believes that's going to be the major thing to turn around
island hold there so big money people can come there and shelter their tax money and stuff like that. >> stephanie: awesome. >> caller: isn't that a great idea? >> stephanie: right. and no rules or regulations of any kind. no stoplights or stop signs just go. >> are you tired of your government taking away liberties and freedoms you can't quite name. welcome welcome susseed with us. your hard-earned money is yours to teen. there are no taxes in -- glen becky becky becky becky stan stan. >> there are no roads, police teachers, libraries, garbage pickup or sewage statement in -- >> glen becky becky becky becky stan stan. >> but you will friend off the wild animals and then the survivalist train willing kick in. who needs government. it is over rated. join us in -- >> glen becky becky stan stan. >> want to shoot your gun in all directions, go ahead. with a small down payment it can be yours. >> above the fruited plains. >> our future is in the past. >> stephanie: good call, producer chris. >> thank you. >> stephanie: you just dropped that out of nowhere. >> i did. it was
taxes sapped growth when you're starving for growth? >> reporter: yeah. and christine lagard, the former french finance minister is here. she and others said, yes, it's gone too far. it is stunted growth. while cutting debt, while cutting expenses, it has had the opposite infect. rather than creating growth and creating an environment for businesses to invest because they think governments are being responsible, things have slowed down so much there's been so much unemployment, 11.6% in the euro zone than it's having the opposite effect. we have to find a more dalan ba approach to how we go forward. europe has a disproportionate influence of this conversation. there is a conversation particularly vis-a-vis the united states as to how much is too much and how much austerity, how much in terms of cutting back is actually enough, christine? >> really nice to see you. when you run into indiana jones, he can have his hat back. nice to see you. >> how many bars are there over the world that have pictures of you in them? >> no, i turned 28 at a davos -- last year -- and it was one of the best b
it does make tough decisions on taxes, on spending, on energy policy, that america has some credibility that we got it more right than wrong. >> tell me about the lobbyists. who are these people? >> well, the problem with lobbyists, a lot of them come off the hill, a lot of them come out of congress. many members of congress leave the capital and go to k street. and it's a real reflection of how money has overtaken politics. and the real problem with that system is not the individual lobbyists. a lot of times they'll have legitimate points to present to members of congress. the problem is the amount of money that lobbyists represent. and what tends to happen in congress is that the concerns of those lobbyists, the concerns of amgen, become much more of the topic of discussion, debate, and resolution than the concerns of middle america, the concerns of the farmers. you know, in congress, we didn't even vote in the house on a farm bill. this is the first time in the history of this country where a house agriculture committee, on which i sat, but in a bipartisan vote, we worked together, p
burials -- attests to the ability of the state to collect taxes in the form of labor, as well as goods and skills needed to put together and control a city of this size. keach: teotihuacan must have had an extensive bureaucracy. everywhere there is evidence of state management, of control. the layout of the city itself was planned. religious and government buildings line two main avenues, with house compounds arranged behind, in a grid pattern. warren barbour has studied these compounds since 1962. this is the central patio of the apartment compound, called sequala, which is a typical apartment compound at teotihuacan. it's about half a football field on the side. it contains a central patio, a temple on the east side, and four apartments. to get the picture of this, you have to see elaborate paintings on the lower sections of the walls... the upper walls painted like wallpaper in reds and whites and greens. the pillars would go up to roofs with wood and covered porticoes, where children would be sitting and playing a game like parchesi. you would see dogs walking around, food being co
the brunt of the troubles. people see rising prices of basic staple goods, tax hikes on subsidies. this is what many criticize and why many are protesting today, what they say is the brotherhoodization of the state. they're saying the brotherhood [indiscernible] for its own political gain. there is a sense instead of trying to reform the state, the muslim brotherhood are instead try to take it over. so that we switch from mubarak to morsi. that is what the main calls are for in this protest today. many are also calling for accountability and justice, retribution for the many hundreds of protesters that have been killed, the many thousands more that have been wounded. today only to low ranking policemen are in prison for killing hundreds of protesters. people see there is no accountability. the police continue to act toward impunity. we're seeing clashes break out right now in the outskirts of tahrir, alexandria, wondering if this is going to escalate or not. protest crux of today's is the direction not only at the brotherhood, but at the remnants of the state, the state bureaucrac
is that it is not always going to be cheap. once people start paying highway taxes like you do for gasoline, that is suddenly going to get more expensive. already you cannot recover your cost of those conversions. certainly do not need all us to pay for those conversions. the problem will be solved in the marketplace, particularly with what is available to us as a resource base today. and that is our own production. one other factor a lot of people miss, besides a wealth creation and all of those things, a big one is that the psychological benefit of us not being under the thumb of opec any longer. the american public likes to be independent. we like to be free. suddenly we can be free from what we have been under for 50 years. the psychological impact of that is huge. >> i have always thought the the impact of oil on american middle east policies was understated. there is an episode where he is looking at the equipment and the people and investment and he says, it costs a lot of money to steal oil. [laughter] i think you're right, there's a certain psychological advantage to it. griffin we
running a country, policymakers who believe in structural reforms, privatizations, tax reforms, budget cuts, labor mobility and the need to be competitive both internally and externally. if you don't have governments with plans like that, you're not going to get them back to growth anytime soon. so it's very, very important that you can do that. seven, the point is the private sector or. and i think this is a problem because at the beginning there was no interest in the case of greece and in some of these other countries in involving the private sector. and, in fact, it was only when things got so bad that greece called upon the private sector with the troika which, as you know, is european union, the european central bank, the ecb and the international monetary fund to really get the private sector involved. and there you had a big haircut. if it had been dealt with earlier, it wouldn't have been as bad, and now they just had to do another debt buyback problem, operation which is still a problem. so i think the idea of getting the private sector involved early on, and we showed this b
spending and i don't think we can continue to tax the american economy. we need economic growth but it's about prioritizing spending. i have conservative beliefs foreign aid can be useful, but we have to get our spending out of control. we utilize the position to encourage the president to work with us in good faith to solve the debt and deficit issue >> i spent six months i guess it was or five months as a member of the super committee. and i put an enormous amount of energy and hope that we would be able to get the bigger bargain. i'm not here to go through the details of why we didn't, that there was a very hard line monitor negotiating position that prevented us from being able to come to an agreement which incidentally we just came to. but we can to this with far less on the table and far less accomplished than we would have if we had come to that agreement six months ago or a year ago. my hope is yes, i certainly will weigh in on that and the degree that it does not impact on - devotee to do my job and the ability of the state department to be able to do its job. we cannot reduce
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 54 (some duplicates have been removed)

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